Schedule

Two Spirits tells the story of Fred Martinez, who was nádleehí, a male-bodied person with a feminine nature, a special gift according to his Navajo community. Tragically, at the age of 16, Martinez would become one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history. Along with Martinez’s story, the film explores integrated gender identities, a belief within some Native American cultures that gender is not simply divided between male and female. This documentary is at once a story of pain and loss and a tale of hope and love as it poses important questions about identify and self-acceptance.

This screening is co-sponsored by Peninsula College’s House of Learning / Longhouse and the student club Rainbow Alliance. Following the screening, Rainbow Alliance members will share their responses to the film during a special student-led panel. 

 

Thursday, January 26, 2017 - 7:00pm
Maier Performance Hall

Two Spirits tells the story of Fred Martinez, who was nádleehí, a male-bodied person with a feminine nature, a special gift according to his Navajo community. Tragically, at the age of 16, Martinez would become one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history. Along with Martinez’s story, the film explores integrated gender identities, a belief within some Native American cultures that gender is not simply divided between male and female. This documentary is at once a story of pain and loss and a tale of hope and love as it poses important questions about identify and self-acceptance.

This screening is co-sponsored by Peninsula College’s House of Learning / Longhouse and the student club Rainbow Alliance. This screening will also include a student-led discussion.

This film is free and open to the public, but donations are accepted. For more information, please contact Dr. Helen Lovejoy at hlovejoy@pencol.edu or (360) 417-6362.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017 - 6:30pm
PC at Forks

UnSlut: A Documentary Film features the diverse stories, told in their own words, of girls and women who have experienced various forms of sexual shaming throughout North America. In addition to those who have survived, the film also tells the story of Rehtaeh Parsons, a Nova Scotia teenager who took her own life in 2013 after being gang-raped and subsequently sexually bullied by her classmates. Through interviews with sexuality experts, advocates, and media figures, UnSlut: A Documentary Film explores the causes and manifestations of gendered sexual shaming and outlines the ways we can work on individual, community, and institutional levels toward a world where sexual assault victims get the support they need and where the word “slut” doesn’t even make sense as an insult.

The screening will be followed by a question-and-answer session with the director, Emily Lindin. Tickets are $5 at the door. Students are free. 

This screening is being co-sponsored by the Port Townsend Film Festival and the PC Sociology Department. For more information, please contact Dr. Helen Lovejoy at hlovejoy@pencol.edu or (360) 417 - 6362.

Thursday, February 9, 2017 - 7:00pm
Maier Performance Hall

A passion driven screening of animation short films with filmmaker Andrea Love including behind the scenes stories, puppets, props, and fiber fun for the audience. Films include Tribeca Film Festival Official Selection “Fear” and real stories told by real puppets like “Revolution,” “Boulton Farm,” Finnriver Cider’s “Handcrafted Love,” and many more. Andrea graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Hampshire College in 2010, concentrating in film studies and sustainable agriculture. For the past five years, she has been living in Port Townsend, Washington, working on organic farms and teaching herself the tedious and addicting craft of traditional animation. 

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 - 5:30pm
Little Theater

In honor of International Women’s Day on March 8, 2017, Magic of Cinema and the Peninsula College House of Learning will be screening The Cherokee Word for Water. This feature length film tells the story of Wilma Mankiller, the first modern female chief of the Cherokee Nation. Set in the 1980s, the film highlights the struggle for and ultimate success of a rural Cherokee community to bring running water into families’ homes using the traditional concept of gadugi—working together to solve a problem.

The screening will be in the Peninsula College House of Learning (Longhouse).

 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017 - 7:00pm
House of Learning - Longhouse

In honor of International Women’s Day on March 8, 2017, Magic of Cinema and the Peninsula College House of Learning will be screening The Cherokee Word for Water. This feature length film tells the story of Wilma Mankiller, the first modern female chief of the Cherokee Nation. Set in the 1980s, the film highlights the struggle for and ultimate success of a rural Cherokee community to bring running water into families’ homes using the traditional concept of gadugi—working together to solve a problem.

Wednesday, March 8, 2017 - 7:00pm
PC at Forks